Language and History in Adorno's Notes to Literature (Studies in Philosophy)

Language and History in Adorno's Notes to Literature (Studies in Philosophy)

Ulrich Plass

Language: English

Pages: 296

ISBN: 0415535905

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Plass argues that Adorno’s essays on literature are of prime importance for an understanding of his aesthetics because they challenge the conceptual limitations of philosophical discourse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the other hand, the idea of Bildung is not to lead the subject into culture and society by merely suppressing nature. Adorno emphasizes that an element of nature that resists social pressure to conform must be preserved at the same time as nature is harnessed and transcended through education. Adorno seeks to maintain a notion of Bildung that signifies precisely this tension between nature and culture. Another way of formulating this notion is to understand Bildung as an aporetic or antinomic

aesthetic achievement.”4 What is merely negative in a social context (the ego that fails to resist the powers of the existing order) becomes positive, or, I would prefer to say, negative in a productive way in literature, because literature provides a medium for experience and reflection on modernity implicitly pitted against the instrumental rationality exemplified by what Adorno calls “identity-thinking.” It thus turns out that literature—and in particular poetry, the most private of all

the Philosophy of Watsuji Tetsur, Kuki Shz, and Martin Heidegger Graham Mayeda Wittgenstein’s Novels Martin Klebes Language and History in Theodor W. Adorno’s Notes to Literature Ulrich Plass Language and History in Theodor W. Adorno’s Notes to Literature Ulrich Plass Routledge New York & London Excerpts from Theodor W. Adorno, Aesthetic Theory, edited by Gretel Adorno and Rolf Tiedemann, newly translated and edited by Robert Hullot-Kentor. English translation copyright (c) 1997 by the

mixing and fusing of genres and styles, it also carries political connotations. More specifically, Adorno depicts the essay as Jewish when he writes: The Art of Transition 27 The person who interprets instead of accepting what is given and classifying it is marked with the yellow star of one who squanders his intelligence in impotent speculation, reading things in where there is nothing to interpret. A man with his feet on the ground [Tatsachenmensch] or a man with his head in the clouds

nature” is, thus, transience itself. This is why poetry has no access to nature as such, or to the subjective experience of “first” (nonhistorical) nature. According to the chiasmus delineated by Adorno, history and nature are caught up in a mirror symmetry. The chiasmus does not yield a dialectic but an aporetic relationship, because nature and history are forever bound to mirror one another, to remain nonidentical with themselves. From the perspective of natural history, allegory will always

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