The Portable Patriot: Documents, Speeches, and Sermons That Compose the American Soul

The Portable Patriot: Documents, Speeches, and Sermons That Compose the American Soul

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 1595555447

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


What does it mean to think, believe, and act like an American?

The soul of America is far more than a concept—it is a people.  Even the most sacred principles mean very little unless lived out passionately by an informed citizenry. In The Portable Patriot you’ll find a carefully assembled sampling of American history’s most formative words, written by the people who made that extraordinary history. Speeches and sermons, essays and extracts, poems and proclamations illumine such values as independence, virtue, humility, bravery, thrift, prayer, enterprise, liberty, and reliance on God. While peering back to the cradle of America’s national identity, The Portable Patriot also points a way forward, compelling us to heed poet John Dickinson’s plea to “rouse your bold hearts at fair Liberty’s call.”

 “Nothing ignites a patriot’s heart—or the hope that the truths of our founding era will prevail again—like the documents assembled in The Portable Patriot. How grateful we should be, and how quick to make these historic words our own.” ?Stephen Mansfield, author, The Forgotten Founding Father and The Faith of the American Soldier

“Our current struggles over taxation, federal debt, and limited government are part of a larger American story. Kudos to Miller and Parrish for highlighting these essential passages.” ?Hon. Andrew P. Napolitano, Senior Judicial Analyst, Fox News Channel

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should commit on the Inhabitants of these States: For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world: For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent: For depriving us in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by Jury: For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offenses For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for

yet matured for falling from the parent stem, but that they were fast advancing to that state, it was thought most prudent to wait a while for them, and to postpone the final decision to July 1. but that this might occasion as little delay as possible a committee was appointed to prepare a declaration of independence. The commee were J. Adams, Dr. Franklin, Roger Sherman, Robert R. Livingston & myself. Committees were also appointed at the same time to prepare a plan of confederation for the

it. He said that Captain Hale had passed through their army, both of Long Island and York Island. That he had procured sketches of the fortifications, and made memoranda of their number and different positions. When apprehended, he was taken before Sir William Howe, and these papers, found concealed about his person, betrayed his intentions. He at once declared his name, his rank in the American army, and his object in coming within the British lines. Sir William Howe, without the form of a

Ministers, Elders and people of this Jurisdiction; Solemnly and seriously to keep the same. Beseeching that being perswaded by the mercies of God we may all, even this whole people offer up our Bodies and Souls as a living and Acceptable Service unto God by Jesus Christ. —BY THE COUNCIL, EDWARD RAWSON SECR. “The Celebration of Thanksgiving Day,” from the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Monthly Bulletin, vol. 26 (1921). 4. EDWARD RANDOLPH’S 1676 REPORT ON NEW ENGLAND’S DISREGARD OF BRITAIN’S

impregnably fortified, or the latter be safely and advantageously promoted. To the preceeding observations I have one to add, which will be most properly addressed to the House of Representatives. It concerns myself, and will therefore be as brief as possible. When I was first honoured with a call into the Service of my Country, then on the eve of an arduous struggle for its liberties, the light in which I contemplated my duty required that I should renounce every pecuniary compensation. From

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